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Consortium Matters: The Future

Dr. Cecilia Cunningham | Director of MCNCAcademic landscapes are changing quickly and organizations need to make adaptations that keep them vital, growing and attractive to old and new members alike. Most importantly, they must remain relevant. With these thoughts in mind the Executive Board met at the Summer Conference 2013 and came to some difficult, but we feel exciting decisions about the Consortium’s future.

We discussed that we need to broaden our outreach to schools and programs that have a dual enrollment component, i.e. Middle Colleges, Early Colleges and High School Dual Enrollment programs. Our mission will be to support dual enrollment as a strategy for high school reform and as a major college and career readiness strategy. To get the word out we will be revising our logo, our web site and our membership requirements.

We have decided to reframe our Design Principles by simplifying them to four pillars for student success in college classes in high school:

• Deep Sustained Collaboration with college partners

• Aligned Academic Programs from the 9th grade through 60 credits

• Student Support appropriate to the needs of the subtends and the demands of the college

• Professional Development focused on the boundary spanning roles of high school and college staff who sustain the collaboration

These four pillars are supported and informed by student data on college success and student perceptions of their experience in Middle/Early Colleges and Dual Enrollment Programs.

We will be working on streamlining our membership application process that will include faculty ratification and college support so that it will survive changes in leadership.

Institutional collaboration is our niche and our strength and we will put that front and center in all of our work. It will be reflected in our communications and in our conference agendas.

To kick off our new focus, NCREST will look at the 8 years of data that we have and align it with our four pillars and provide a mechanism for emerging knowledge about our pillars at our Winter Leadership Conference. We will not have a traditional TA conference but use our aggregate data to inform our work more closely. The 2012-13 data will still be available for your schools at the winter conference

 

And with that in mind we share our new MCNC MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Middle College National Consortium is to increase the number of students nationally who have access to supported dual enrollment in Early Colleges, Middle Colleges and Dual Enrollment Programs.

By

• Providing leadership and Support for Continuous improvement in member schools and programs

• Providing Technical Assistance for new Early Colleges and Dual Enrollment Programs

• Collecting and Analyzing Data for School and Program Improvement and to validate the positive outcomes for students

• Providing cross-city and cross institutional learning opportunities about practices that result in increased college completion rates

• Ensuring that Student Voice informs school and program design through the use of student surveys and the Annual National Student Leadership Initiative

 

So that member schools and programs can develop and sustain a successful model of collaborative education that expands students’ future opportunities.

CEC Middle College: Where College and Career Readiness Go Hand in Hand

MCNC CEC Denver

High school graduation is a time of celebration and completion, but one laced with the shadow of “What next?” Behind the happy faces of graduates tossing mortarboards and parents beaming with pride for their children’s accomplishment are questions about the future. Career Education Center students standing on the stage of Community College of Denver last Spring had clear answers and no doubts. They claimed tangible real world skills along with discipline and skills to succeed in college. This class was a landmark one for the school, with accomplishments exceeding even the highest expectations of faculty, parents, peers and the graduates themselves.

CEC Middle College has a lot to be proud of. One of the Consortium’s oldest members, it has the unique mission of offering students high school requirements, college course credits and certificate bearing classes and internships that get students college and career ready.

In September CEC was acknowledged in Denver’s Magazine, 5280 as one of the top 20 high schools on the Front Range of Colorado. But that was only one of several accolades for principal, Scott Springer who says his school is riding a wave of growing success.

“We had our largest graduating class last year of just under 100 students,” said Springer. “The 2013 class had the highest ACT scores ever. Graduates earned more than $1.7 million in scholarships and all graduates were accepted to CCD (Community College of Denver). Moreover, 87 students got offers from two colleges or more.”

CEC Middle College offers hands-on, versatile, relevant and rigorous classes for students who are earning college credits at the Denver school. Currently the school has 400 full and 320 part-time students enrolled. Part time for CEC Denver refers to students who do half days at CEC and half at their home high schools. All students are enrolled in one of eighteen career programs.

College success for these students means time saved and dollars earned. These dollars translate into savings for their families, savings for the institutions, which will not have to remediate college ready-college performing-graduates, and to graduates who are trained in fields that are waiting to hire career ready youth. Last year’s students earned more than 1,500 semester hours of college credit which adds up to more than $180,000 in college tuition. 67 students graduated with 12 college credits or more; and three graduated with more than 40 hours. Students were awarded $1,795,000 in scholarships ($900,000 by the Denver Scholarship Foundation). An unprecedented three students earned the prestigious Daniels Fund Scholarship which covers full tuition, lodging and travel for four years.

CEC graduates were also exemplary in their academics. Nineteen seniors qualified for Phi Theta Kappa, Community College of Denver’s honor organization, earning a minimum of 12 college credits and a college GPA of 3.5 or higher. This year was the first year in the history of CEC, the school brought home a school Championship. CEC’s Robotics team won the National competition, which earned them a spot to represent the school in the World Competition in St. Louis in April. Many of the team members were seniors.

MCNC and its members all congratulate CEC Denver and their principal, Scott Springer on these accomplishments and wish them nothing but mile high honors in the future.

CEC Denver Graduation

 

 

 

 

If your school has great stories to share, please share them with our readers.  Contact MCNC Newsletter

tborn39396 (at) aol.com.

 

Awards for Greenville Technical Charter HS and Brashier Middle College

The 2010 high school reports released by the South Carolina State Department of Education revealed that Greenville Tech Charter High was tops in the county and number 3 in the state on the graduation rate, at 99%. Brashier Middle College ranked second in the county and seventh in the state, graduating 94.4 percent of its students in four years. Brashier had the highest absolute rating in the county and third-highest in the state. Brashier  Principal, Mike Sinclair wrote, “To be recognized as second behind GTCHS in graduation rate is great.  To receive the highest rating in the county and third highest in the state is amazing for us.  The absolute rating includes End of Course scores for our freshmen (Algebra I, English I, and Physical Science), End of Course scores for our juniors (US History), our Exit Exam Pass Rate (sophomores), and our Graduation Rate (seniors).  No one can hide in this measure of success. Each member of our school community played a part in our success.  The goals and support from the Middle College Consortium were invaluable.  The support from Greenville Technical College has allowed our students to push into college courses and attend classes in a state of the art facility. The planning group that founded the school fought tirelessly to provide this opportunity for us all when it appeared the school would never open”. In addition,  U.S. News & World Report has ranked Greenville Technical Charter HS  as having the No. 4 “Most Connected Classroom” in the nation. According to Principal Fred Crawford, “every teacher has an iPad, and every room is equipped with Smartboard and interactive technology. Students can take college courses online and link to a blackboard interface with college professors. The teens can even check out laptops from Greenville Technical College. Our kids are all digital natives. This is what they’ve grown up with.” The schools were rated on various indicators of connectivity, including Internet speed and wireless access, computer access, connectivity to school from home, and additional technological resources. “Internet connection and computer technologies are shaping the future classroom for students and teachers,” said U.S. News & World Report editor and chief content officer Brian Kelly. The Consortium congratulates all these schools on their outstanding achievements.

Article on Successful College Retention Practices to Be Published in Community College Week

Five Lessons on College Retention from Early Colleges, an article laying out the practices used in early college high schools that lead to student success in college, will be published today in Community College Week. The authors, Dr. Cecilia Cunningham and Dr. Roberta Matthews have a twenty-five year history of working together on high school/college collaborations.

Quote startThe intentional links between secondary and post secondary education found in Middle College National Consortium and Woodrow Wilson early college high schools help students not only get to college but to stay in collegeQuote end

New York, NY (Vocus/PRWEB) April 12, 2011

Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, founder and president of the Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) , and Dr. Roberta Matthews, former Provost and Vice-President for Academic Affairs at Brooklyn College in New York City, announced that their article, Five Lessons on College Retention from Early Colleges, will be published in Community College Week this week. The article describes lessons learned on effective tactics to keep students in college by two organizations, The Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) and the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. “The intentional links between secondary and post secondary education found in Middle College National Consortium and Woodrow Wilson early college high schools help students not only get to college but to stay in college” notes MCNC president, Dr. Cecilia Cunningham.

The Middle College National Consortium and the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation have opened, and supported, over fifty small early college high schools. Their high school students’ record of college GPA average, college course credit accumulation and college perseverance exceeds those of students from other schools with similar demographics. According to the article by Dr. Cunningham and Dr. Matthews, the five early college practices that have had the most influence on student success are:

  • Being on a college campus rather than transitioning onto one

    Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, President MCNC

  • Wraparound support and advocacy for students
  • No interruptions or diversions between graduating from high school and entering college
  • Building realistic understandings and expectations in students’ families
  • Strong alignment between high schools and colleges is seen as a given, not simply a goal

Dr. Matthews concludes by noting “Early Colleges succeed because they create an environment based on the presence of all the design features we have described. They promote the difficult dialogue among practitioners, on all levels, that result in substantive changes in education.”

Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain high school/college dual enrollment as a viable and necessary educational model. Middle College National Consortium’s mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s Degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.

To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of our history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://mcnc.us
718-361-1981 X6
thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us

Professor Eric Nadelstern to Give Keynote Address at Middle College National Consortium’s 18th Annual Summer Institute

The Middle College National Consortium will hold its annual Summer PD Institute from July 7-July 10 at the Hyatt Regency, in Jersey City, NJ. Professor Eric Nadelstern, former Deputy Chancellor for School Support and Instruction at the New York City Department of Education, and leader of its Small School Initiative, will give the keynote address.

Quote startProfessor Nadelstern’s deep understanding and extensive history with school reform and preparing underserved students for college make him a must hear for anybody working to improve schoolsQuote end

New York, NY (Vocus/PRWEB) March 29, 2011

The Middle College National Consortium (MCNC), a pioneer in the Early College/Dual Enrollment school movement, is pleased to announce that renowned educator Professor Eric Nadelstern will be the keynote speaker at its annual conference in July. The theme of this year’s conference will be “How Do You Become a College Ready School”.

Professor Eric Nadelstern

Professor Nadelstern, who was the founding principal of International High School, a MCNC member, will trace the origins of his school reform efforts starting with his work with new arrivals at International HS and concluding with his leadership at The New York City’s Department of Education’s Small School Initiative. Additionally, there will be workshops and panel discussions on issues related to College Readiness-Key Cognitive Skills that students need in college; College Knowledge-what do students need to know in order to succeed in college; and Communities of Practice that lead to success. Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, founder and President of MCNC, stated that “Professor Nadelstern’s deep understanding and extensive history with school reform and preparing underserved students for college make him a must hear for anybody working to improve schools.”

Professor Nadelstern is presently a Professor of Practice in Educational Leadership at Teachers College, Columbia University; Visiting Senior Fellow at The Woodrow Wilson Foundation; and a Transition Team Member for the newly appointed New Jersey Commissioner of Education. Prior to his present positions Professor Nadelstern was the Deputy Chancellor for School Support and Instruction with the New York City Department of Education where he led the Department’s Small School Initiative.

The Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain high school/college dual enrollment as a viable and necessary educational model. Middle College National Consortium’s mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s Degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.

The MCNC Summer Professional Development Institute will be held from July 7-July 10, 2011 at the Hyatt Regency on the Hudson in Jersey City, New Jersey. To learn more about this event, or register, please click here.

To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of our history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://mcnc.us
718-361-1981 X6
thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us