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Consortium Matters: The Future

Dr. Cecilia Cunningham | Director of MCNCAcademic landscapes are changing quickly and organizations need to make adaptations that keep them vital, growing and attractive to old and new members alike. Most importantly, they must remain relevant. With these thoughts in mind the Executive Board met at the Summer Conference 2013 and came to some difficult, but we feel exciting decisions about the Consortium’s future.

We discussed that we need to broaden our outreach to schools and programs that have a dual enrollment component, i.e. Middle Colleges, Early Colleges and High School Dual Enrollment programs. Our mission will be to support dual enrollment as a strategy for high school reform and as a major college and career readiness strategy. To get the word out we will be revising our logo, our web site and our membership requirements.

We have decided to reframe our Design Principles by simplifying them to four pillars for student success in college classes in high school:

• Deep Sustained Collaboration with college partners

• Aligned Academic Programs from the 9th grade through 60 credits

• Student Support appropriate to the needs of the subtends and the demands of the college

• Professional Development focused on the boundary spanning roles of high school and college staff who sustain the collaboration

These four pillars are supported and informed by student data on college success and student perceptions of their experience in Middle/Early Colleges and Dual Enrollment Programs.

We will be working on streamlining our membership application process that will include faculty ratification and college support so that it will survive changes in leadership.

Institutional collaboration is our niche and our strength and we will put that front and center in all of our work. It will be reflected in our communications and in our conference agendas.

To kick off our new focus, NCREST will look at the 8 years of data that we have and align it with our four pillars and provide a mechanism for emerging knowledge about our pillars at our Winter Leadership Conference. We will not have a traditional TA conference but use our aggregate data to inform our work more closely. The 2012-13 data will still be available for your schools at the winter conference

 

And with that in mind we share our new MCNC MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Middle College National Consortium is to increase the number of students nationally who have access to supported dual enrollment in Early Colleges, Middle Colleges and Dual Enrollment Programs.

By

• Providing leadership and Support for Continuous improvement in member schools and programs

• Providing Technical Assistance for new Early Colleges and Dual Enrollment Programs

• Collecting and Analyzing Data for School and Program Improvement and to validate the positive outcomes for students

• Providing cross-city and cross institutional learning opportunities about practices that result in increased college completion rates

• Ensuring that Student Voice informs school and program design through the use of student surveys and the Annual National Student Leadership Initiative

 

So that member schools and programs can develop and sustain a successful model of collaborative education that expands students’ future opportunities.

Fulfulling Promises: Winter 2014

Fulfulling Promises: Winter 2014

 

 

 

Graduates Perspectives on College

Written By:  Jennifer Kim, National Center for Restructuring Education, Schools, and Teaching ( NCREST)

As our school communities fine tune priorities for this school year, these student perspectives about colleges from the past three MCNC Early Colleges will motivate and challenge schools to continue and improve their student supports for college readiness.

As the goal of Early College is to provide high school students with an early start to enrolling in college classes, data over time have shown that MCNC Early College students earn a significant number of college credits and are successful in their coursework. Focus group interviews with more than 100 students across the MCNC Early College schools indicate that students and teachers alike are vested in related academic and social supports.  However, it is the student that gives voice to student perspectives about high school and college.

The Middle College National Consortium Graduating Student Survey has been administered annually in April, to Early College students in their final year of high school.  This article will highlight some key aspects tied to college readiness.  Data will be shown for the past three graduating classes, showing the trends, more consistent than not, over time.

The demographic profile of graduating students at MCNC Early Colleges has been mostly consistent over the past three years.  The set of figures below show that the overwhelming majority of students have been non-white, tended to be more female than male, and a little over half were on free/reduced lunch.  Overall demographic data representing students from grade levels across the MCNC Early Colleges reflect similar patterns.

 

Demographic Profile of Graduating Students

College Aspirations 

While almost all of the students want to complete college, not all of them think they can.  More than 90% of the students over the past few years indicate “wanting” to achieve a college level education or higher, yet a slightly lower percentage of students “think” they will be able to do so.  This is not necessarily surprising as many students, particularly those from underrepresented groups, face various postsecondary education obstacles.  However, this gap decreased over the past three years, so that for the most recent year, there was only a one percent difference.

Post High School Aspirations

College Readiness

An overwhelming high percent of graduating students consistently report feeling college ready.  On average, more than 90% of the students each year voiced that they had a clear understanding of what college would be like, and the same percent of students could also easily imagine themselves as a college student.  A similar high percent of students felt confident aboutCollege Readiness handling their coursework on their own.  Interestingly, in separate interviews with MCNC Early College teachers, some voiced the concern over whether students would feel independent enough once they left the school since they had been accustomed to high degree of support system during high school.  This should quell the concern of “too much support.”

College Planning

While students may want to achieve a college education and also feel college ready, they must do some planning and required steps ahead of time in order to continue with college after high school.  Over 80% of the graduating students consistently reported completing a college application, while over 70% indicated they had filled out financial aid forms for college.  While these percentages are for the most part high, there is about a 10% gap between students completing a college application and financial aid forms.  In addition, a similar high percent of students indicated they had received help with these things from their school. College Planning

Many of the students make plans to continue enrolling in classes at the partnering college and report being accepted at a college for the upcoming school year.  A majority of the Early College students have enrolled in many college classes during high school and earned a significant number of college credits at the partnering college.  Several students have also earned their Associate’s Degree upon high school graduation.  However, while many students have been accepted at a college or made plans to continue on at the partnering institutions, they had yet to figure out how they would pay for this.

College Plans

Conclusion

The overwhelming majority of MCNC Early College students aspire to complete a college level education and express being ready for college.  Financing college continues to be a concern for students, but the majority of graduating students have taken the necessary steps to be in a strong position to continue their college coursework already begun in high school, on into college.  Reviewing the Consortium-wide data, in conjunction with schools’ individual reports, can serve as a discussion starting point about college readiness and student support priorities for this school year.NCREST

 

Fulfilling Promises: Winter 2011

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Fulfilling Promises
Vol. 17 | No. 1  | Winter 2011


Announcement: 

MCNC has redesigned and launched the new and improved website to be more user-friendly and informative about the Middle / Early College. Visit our new website at www.mcnc.us


In this Issue 

Click here to read the entire newsletter (PDF Version)


Consortium Matters

Cecilia Cunningham | DirectorIn June 2010, the New York City Department of Education in collaboration with the City University of New York (CUNY) issued a report to every NYC high school on the retention rate for the 2007 graduates who had enrolled in CUNY and were still there after 4 semesters.  Preliminary data suggest that MCNC Early Colleges and their College partners have institutionalized practices worth replicating by colleges seeking to retain and graduate an under-served population.

Read More


Student Support and College Readiness
Lead to Harbor’s Success

…College Readiness is infused in every subject area.  The social studies department challenges students to become critical thinkers and effective communicators by requiring them to read and analyze complex texts…The math department uses research-based educational tools for course analysis and performance assessment…

Read More


Become a College Ready School
18th Annual Summer Professional Development Institute 2011
July 7 – 10, 2011
Hyatt Regency Jersey City
New Jersey, NJ

Register Now
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Electronic Professional Development at Charles School
Writing well is one of the most important skills to master for college success.

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Michigan Nurtures Early Middle Colleges
When Middle Colleges first began in Michigan in 1990, few would thought that 21 years later there would be 20 schools embodying those same principles.

Read More

“I’ve Never Had To Do This Before”
So spoke a 12th grader when asked to apply his math knowledge to a real life example.  What’s going on here?

Read More

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Middle College National Consortium
27-28 Thomson Avenue, Suite 331, Long Island City, NY 11101
718-361-1981
www.mcnc.us

Professor Eric Nadelstern to Give Keynote Address at Middle College National Consortium’s 18th Annual Summer Institute

The Middle College National Consortium will hold its annual Summer PD Institute from July 7-July 10 at the Hyatt Regency, in Jersey City, NJ. Professor Eric Nadelstern, former Deputy Chancellor for School Support and Instruction at the New York City Department of Education, and leader of its Small School Initiative, will give the keynote address.

Quote startProfessor Nadelstern’s deep understanding and extensive history with school reform and preparing underserved students for college make him a must hear for anybody working to improve schoolsQuote end

New York, NY (Vocus/PRWEB) March 29, 2011

The Middle College National Consortium (MCNC), a pioneer in the Early College/Dual Enrollment school movement, is pleased to announce that renowned educator Professor Eric Nadelstern will be the keynote speaker at its annual conference in July. The theme of this year’s conference will be “How Do You Become a College Ready School”.

Professor Eric Nadelstern

Professor Nadelstern, who was the founding principal of International High School, a MCNC member, will trace the origins of his school reform efforts starting with his work with new arrivals at International HS and concluding with his leadership at The New York City’s Department of Education’s Small School Initiative. Additionally, there will be workshops and panel discussions on issues related to College Readiness-Key Cognitive Skills that students need in college; College Knowledge-what do students need to know in order to succeed in college; and Communities of Practice that lead to success. Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, founder and President of MCNC, stated that “Professor Nadelstern’s deep understanding and extensive history with school reform and preparing underserved students for college make him a must hear for anybody working to improve schools.”

Professor Nadelstern is presently a Professor of Practice in Educational Leadership at Teachers College, Columbia University; Visiting Senior Fellow at The Woodrow Wilson Foundation; and a Transition Team Member for the newly appointed New Jersey Commissioner of Education. Prior to his present positions Professor Nadelstern was the Deputy Chancellor for School Support and Instruction with the New York City Department of Education where he led the Department’s Small School Initiative.

The Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain high school/college dual enrollment as a viable and necessary educational model. Middle College National Consortium’s mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s Degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.

The MCNC Summer Professional Development Institute will be held from July 7-July 10, 2011 at the Hyatt Regency on the Hudson in Jersey City, New Jersey. To learn more about this event, or register, please click here.

To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of our history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://mcnc.us
718-361-1981 X6
thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us

Water Sustainability: How We Live With Our Rivers Is the Focus of the Middle College National Consortium’s Annual Student Leadership Initiative

The Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) proudly announces that students from across the country are putting the final touches on their projects for the Middle College National Consortium’s annual Student Leadership Initiative. MCNC has become a national leader in school reform by implementing a school design that bridges the high school and college experience for underserved youth, leading to increased access to, and success in, college. A data driven, practitioner network of 34 small Middle College and Early College high schools nationwide, MCNC provides high school students with the opportunity to earn both their high school diploma and up to two years of transferable college credit upon graduating.

Long Island City, NY (Vocus) April 27, 2010

In anticipation of Early College Week and after months of preparation, the Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) proudly announces that students from across the country are putting the final touches on their projects for MCNC’s annual Student Leadership Initiative. To be held from April 28 to May 1, the Student Leadership Initiative will focus on Water Sustainability: How We Live With Our Rivers. Greenville,  South Carolina’s partner Middle College High Schools, Greenville Technical Charter High School, Greer Middle College High School and Brashier Middle College Charter High School, in association with Greenville Technical College, are proud to be this year’s hosts.

Provocative projects on the subject include:

  • Fundraising to support Water of Life, an organization providing clean drinking water to countries of Africa
  • A mini-documentary outlining the impact of bodies of water, such as rivers, wetlands and tributaries, on our every-day living, as well as, community, social and cultural life
  • With the expected population growth in Denver, Colorado looming, a research study dealing with local efforts to conserve water
  • Research comparing two bodies of water in Brooklyn, one on the Superfund Clean-up list and the other a lake in Prospect Park, to demonstrate how it is possible to maintain clean water in an urban environment
  • Working with the Buffalo-Niagara River Keepers to clean up the shoreline of Cazenovia Creek to ensure clean drinking water from Lake Erie

Dr. Cecilia Cunningham, Founder and Director of the MCNC, states that “the value of the leadership initiative goes beyond merely bringing students together to develop leadership skills”. “It gives participants the opportunity to explore social, environmental and cultural issues”.  “They do this as they discover skills they never realized they had, demonstrate initiative and  develop critical thinking.”  “Students and teachers set high expectations for themselves and then strive to meet them. Entire schools often become involved in the projects, gaining research skills and eventually getting more involved in their communities.”
The Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain dual enrollment, high school and college, as a viable and necessary educational model.  Its mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.
To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of the history, design principles, current work and achievements.
Contact information: Tony HoffmannMiddle College National Consortium http://mcnc.us    718-361-1981 thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us