Leader in School Reform MCNC Hosts Prestigious Leadership Conference February 10

The 2011 MCNC Winter Principal’s Leadership Conference will focus on the relationship between improved leadership, instruction and college readiness, including high school dual enrollment. Education leadership and the theory of change will be subjects of the keynote address to be delivered by Dr. Larry Cuban, Professor Emeritus of Education at Stanford University. Read more

Two Middle College National Consortium Schools Win Major Education Awards

Harbor Preparation Teacher Academy and Hollis F. Price Early College High School, twoMiddle College National Consortium Early College dual enrollment schools, are proud to havereceived the prestigious 2010 National Title 1 School Awards from the U.S. Department ofEducation. Harbor Prep and Hollis Price not only outperformed other Title 1 schools but alsodid significantly better on standardized tests and college going rates than non Title 1 schools. Read more

Professor Larry Cuban will Keynote MCNC’s Leadership Conference

The Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) will hold its 17th annual Winter Principal’s Leadership Conference from February 11, 2011 to February 13, 2011 at the Newport Beach (CA) Hyatt Regency. The theme of this year’s conference will be “Improving College Readiness by Focusing on Instruction” and will be keynoted by Dr. Larry Cuban, Professor Emeritus of Education at Stanford University. MCNC is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain dual enrollment as a viable and necessary educational model. Read more

Diane Ravitch and David T. Conley will be Featured Speakers at Middle College National Consortium’s Annual Summer Institute

The Middle College National Consortium, a leader in the movement to establish and sustain high school/college dual enrollment, will hold its annual Summer Institute from June 27 to July 1, 2010 at the Jersey City Hyatt Hotel.

Long Island City, NY (Vocus) June 22, 2010

Middle College National Consortium will hold its annual Summer Institute from June 27 to July 1, 2010 at the Jersey City Hyatt Hotel. During this time, 224 educators, representing thirty one Consortium schools around the country, will converge on the Hyatt Hotel to learn from distinguished speakers, participate in workshops, share ideas, and network with like-minded educators. By and large the workshops are facilitated by faculty from participating Consortium schools given that teachers have a unique understanding of what constitutes successful practices in a classroom setting. This year’s workshops are geared towards the theme of College Readiness, such as How to Bridge the Gap Between High School and College Readiness, Using Technology to Engage Students in Inquiry- Based Science, and College Access Through Inquiry.

Diane Ravitch, one of the leading educators in the United States today, will be the keynote speaker. In her latest book, “The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice are Undermining Education” Ms. Ravitch decries merit pay, privatization of schools, small schools and especially high stakes testing. A lively debate is sure to follow her presentation.

Also featured is Dr. David T. Conley, Professor of Educational Policy Research at the University of Oregon and founder and Chief Executive Officer of the Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC). Professor Conley’s latest book, “College and Career Ready: Helping All Students Succeed Beyond High School” is a primer on preparing students to succeed in college as well as taking advantage of learning opportunities beyond high school.

Dr. Cecilia Cunningham, founder and Director of the Middle College National Consortium, states that “these two lions of education understand the true meaning of college readiness, and their ideas about curriculum, teaching strategies and support structures are the true drivers of college readiness, a goal for all students”. The Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain high school/college dual enrollment as a viable and necessary educational model. Middle College National Consortium’s mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s Degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.

To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of the history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://mcnc.us
718-361-1981
thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us

 

Middle College National Consortium’s Annual Student Leadership Initiative on Water Sustainability a Grand Success

Students from 22 Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) High Schools (see sidebar) arrived in Greenville, South Carolina with a goal of engaging in a dialogue about their own research and to explore what an up-and-coming, environmentally progressive, community is doing about water. The focus of the annual MCNC Student Leadership Initiative was Our Water, Our Responsibility: How Can We Preserve and Protect The Natural Resource That Gives Us Life?

New York City (Vocus) May 25, 2010

After eight months of on-line and local exploration, students from 22 Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) High Schools (see sidebar) arrived in Greenville, South Carolina. Their goal: to engage in dialogue about their own research and explore what an up-and-coming, environmentally progressive, community is doing about water. MCNC’s annual Student Leadership Initiative was held from April 28 to May 1, and focused on Our Water, Our Responsibility: How Can We Preserve and Protect The Natural Resource That Gives Us Life? This Student Leadership Initiative was hosted by Greenville, South Carolina’s partner Middle College High Schools: Greenville Technical Charter High School, Greer Middle College High School and Brashier Middle College Charter High School, in association with Greenville Technical College.

Each of the host schools had opportunities to demonstrate their hospitality and their specialties. Greenville Technical Charter HS Social Studies and Art teacher, Cleo Crank, led students in a watercolor art project that combined poetry, painting and collaboration. Students also got to experience the difficulties desert communities endure just to get enough water for survival; to explore pond water with a microscope; to identify microbes and organisms within the pond; and to debate the issues local fishermen are facing. Brashier Middle College Charter High School, where technology is in abundance, provided a canvas where students made original video slideshows to illustrate Water Quotes from literature and current events.

Saturday was the culmination of the MCNC Student Leadership Initiative. It started with everyone participating in the annual H.O.G. Day Cleanup (Hands on Greenville) where MCNC students collected considerable amounts of trash along the Reedy River. Finally, the highlight of the conference was when each school made presentations of their local water projects. From Robert F. Wagner Jr. High School’s campaign to bring together teens on October 10, 2010 to make “Water Is Totally Free” (http://www.wateristotallyfree.org), to children’s books written by the students at Hollis F. Price Early College HS, the passion and intellectual engagement of these students shone through. Students from SW Memphis Early College HS created a documentary illustrating how the Mississippi is the lifeblood of their city; and recent immigrants from the International High School at LaGuardia Community College shared a video about their efforts to remedy pollution at Newtown Creek, a potential Superfund site.

Terry Born, the MCNC’s Student Leadership Initiative project director stated that, “Many of our country’s future environmental leaders were born in this conference”. “It was refreshing to see the idealism and dedication that these students showed towards cleaning up our rivers”.

The Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain dual enrollment, high school and college, as a viable and necessary educational model. Middle College National Consortium’s mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s Degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.

To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of the history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://mcnc.us
718-361-1981
thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us

 

Middle College National Consortium Proud to Share in the Celebration of Successful Early College HS Initiative

The Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) is pleased to announce its participation in Early College HS Week, May 3-May-9, 2010 which celebrates the success of the Early College HS movement. Early College High Schools (ECHS) provide high school students with the opportunity to earn both a high school diploma and up to two years of transferable college credit upon graduation.

Long Island City, NY (Vocus) May 4, 2010

Early College High School Week, May 3-May 9, 2010, promises to be an exciting celebration of the success of the Early College High School movement. Early College High Schools (ECHS) provide high school students with the opportunity to earn both a high school diploma and up to two years of transferable college credit upon graduation. President Obama stated, “High schools shouldn’t just make sure students graduate…they should make sure students graduate ready for college, ready for a career, and ready for life”. Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) is proud to be part of the Early College High School Initiative, a consortium of schools working with Jobs for the Future (JFF) and funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
The nineteen Middle College National Consortium Early College HS partner schools (see attachment) serve a student population which is generally underserved in high schools and underrepresented on college campuses. The MCNC focuses on professional development and staff leadership, comprehensive academic, social and emotional student support, and high school-college collaboration.

Middle College National Consortium’s Student Leadership Initiative, April 28-May 1, which led up to Early College High School Week 2010, was held in Greenville, South Carolina. The topic, Water Sustainability: How We Live With Our Rivers, featured student-led and initiated research projects including: mini-documentaries, fundraising for Water for Life, an organization providing clean drinking water in Africa, a clean-up campaign for a local shoreline, and various projects on how to bring rivers back to life.

Middle College National Consortium’s network includes 19 Early College High Schools nationwide, enrolling 6,050 students. Students are 79% minority, with 53% qualifying for free or reduced lunch and have a school attendance rate of 95%. Its 2008-09 cohort of 9th to 12th graders had an average 2.75 college GPA, a 92% college course pass rate and has earned an average of 9.2 college credits. Upon graduating from HS 12th graders accumulated an average of 14 college credits.

MCNC Director and founder, Dr Cecilia Cunningham says, “We are proud to be part of the Early College Week 2010, which showcases the remarkable achievements of individual schools and their students. Hopefully it will act as a catalyst for the expansion of ECHSs in school districts across the country.”

The Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain dual enrollment, high school and college, as a viable and necessary educational model. Its mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.

To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of the history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information:
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://www.mcnc.us
718-361-1981
thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us

 

Water Sustainability: How We Live With Our Rivers Is the Focus of the Middle College National Consortium’s Annual Student Leadership Initiative

The Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) proudly announces that students from across the country are putting the final touches on their projects for the Middle College National Consortium’s annual Student Leadership Initiative. MCNC has become a national leader in school reform by implementing a school design that bridges the high school and college experience for underserved youth, leading to increased access to, and success in, college. A data driven, practitioner network of 34 small Middle College and Early College high schools nationwide, MCNC provides high school students with the opportunity to earn both their high school diploma and up to two years of transferable college credit upon graduating.

Long Island City, NY (Vocus) April 27, 2010

In anticipation of Early College Week and after months of preparation, the Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) proudly announces that students from across the country are putting the final touches on their projects for MCNC’s annual Student Leadership Initiative. To be held from April 28 to May 1, the Student Leadership Initiative will focus on Water Sustainability: How We Live With Our Rivers. Greenville,  South Carolina’s partner Middle College High Schools, Greenville Technical Charter High School, Greer Middle College High School and Brashier Middle College Charter High School, in association with Greenville Technical College, are proud to be this year’s hosts.

Provocative projects on the subject include:

  • Fundraising to support Water of Life, an organization providing clean drinking water to countries of Africa
  • A mini-documentary outlining the impact of bodies of water, such as rivers, wetlands and tributaries, on our every-day living, as well as, community, social and cultural life
  • With the expected population growth in Denver, Colorado looming, a research study dealing with local efforts to conserve water
  • Research comparing two bodies of water in Brooklyn, one on the Superfund Clean-up list and the other a lake in Prospect Park, to demonstrate how it is possible to maintain clean water in an urban environment
  • Working with the Buffalo-Niagara River Keepers to clean up the shoreline of Cazenovia Creek to ensure clean drinking water from Lake Erie

Dr. Cecilia Cunningham, Founder and Director of the MCNC, states that “the value of the leadership initiative goes beyond merely bringing students together to develop leadership skills”. “It gives participants the opportunity to explore social, environmental and cultural issues”.  “They do this as they discover skills they never realized they had, demonstrate initiative and  develop critical thinking.”  “Students and teachers set high expectations for themselves and then strive to meet them. Entire schools often become involved in the projects, gaining research skills and eventually getting more involved in their communities.”
The Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain dual enrollment, high school and college, as a viable and necessary educational model.  Its mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.
To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of the history, design principles, current work and achievements.
Contact information: Tony HoffmannMiddle College National Consortium http://mcnc.us    718-361-1981 thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us