Professor Linda Darling-Hammond To Give Keynote Address At MCNC’s Winter Principals’ Leadership Conference

Middle College National Consortium will hold it’s 21st annual Winter Principals’ Leadership Conference from February 14-February 16 at the Newport Beach, California Hyatt Regency. Professor Linda Darling-Hammond, the renowned Stanford University educator, will give the keynote address. In 2006 Professor Darling-Hammond was named one of the nation’s ten most influential people affecting educational policy over the last decade for her work that led to sweeping changes in teaching and teacher education across the U.S.


New York, NY (PRWEB) October 10, 2012

Middle College National Consortium is pleased to announce that Professor Linda Darling-Hammond will give the keynote address at MCNC’s 21st annual Winter Principals’ Leadership Conference. Professor Darling-Hammond is renowned for her work on school restructuring, teacher quality, and educational equity. She created the Stanford Educational Leadership Institute and the School Redesign Network. In 1996 Professor Darling Hammond authored the influential report What Matters Most: Teaching for America’s Future. This report led to dramatic changes in teaching and teacher education in the U.S. Because of the report, and its influence on national education policy, in 2006 Professor Darling-Hammond was named one of the nation’s ten most influential people affecting educational policy over the last decade.
The MCNC Winter Principals’ Leadership Conference will be held from Thursday, February 14, 2013-Saturday, February 16, 2013 at the beautiful Newport Beach Hyatt Regency. This conference is open to, and appropriate for, all Middle and Early College High School leaders (both official and unofficial), non-Middle College small school leaders, school district staff, personnel from educational organizations, and college personnel involved in education. Professor Darling Hammond will make herself available for a question and answer session subsequent to her keynote address.
Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, founder and director of the Middle College National Consortium commented, “The MCNC Winter Principals’ Leadership Conference is a perfect match with Professor Darling-Hammond’s experience at the organization she launched, The Stanford Educational Leadership Institute. Her policy work on school restructuring, teacher quality and educational equity has been a game changer. We very much look forward to working with her.” For those people desiring to learn more about the conference, or register, please visit the MCNC website site at: http://www.mcnc.us.
MCNC is a pioneer in developing small schools on college campuses where high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s degree or transferable college credits upon graduation. MCNC, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain dual enrollment in high school as a viable and necessary college readiness educational model. To get a comprehensive overview of the history, design principles, current work and achievements of the Middle College National Consortium, please visit us at http://www.mcnc.us.
Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
O. 718-361-1981 X6
THoffmann (at) mcnc (dot) us
http://www.mcnc.us

Middle College National Consortium Jams on Peer Review: “Crowdsourcing Teacher Evaluation”.

“Crowdsourcing Teacher Evaluation: Let the Voices of Teachers be Heard”, the third in a series of MCNC Jams, attracted dozens of early college high school teachers who shared their experience with Peer Review. The core idea is that a reflective staff that uses a structured process of “peer review” to examine individual practice, combined with a collective commitment to specific learning outcomes, improves teaching and learning for all students.

New York, NY (PRWEB) June 12, 2012

The Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) held a Jam on Peer Review, the process of improving pedagogy that it has developed over

Dr. Cecilia Cunningham

"If teachers learn to be reflective, build professional relationships among peers, become more purposeful in planning and feel that they are true stakeholders in the success of a school then students will be the true beneficiaries of a changed system."

the past three decades. “Crowdsourcing Teacher Evaluation: Let the Voices of Teachers be Heard” attracted dozens of early college high school teachers who shared their experience with Peer Review. School administrators, district personnel and college faculty also participated.

Peer Review is a three-year process undertaken by the full staff of a school. To be successful Peer Review must be strongly supported by the school administration but managed independently by the school staff. The core idea is that a reflective staff that uses a structured process of “peer review” to examine individual practice, combined with a collective commitment to specific learning outcomes, improves teaching and learning for all students.

The Jam, an asynchronous online text-based exchange, addressed the criticality of building trust among staff before and during the Peer Review process. Many teachers spoke of the tremendous insights they have gained from their peer reviews, the growth they could observe in their practice and the impact on their students. One teacher observed “ Hearing a colleague praise a practice in my classroom, one that perhaps I had taken for granted, was a boon to my efficacy as a content teacher and classroom manager”. Others spoke of feeling less isolated and of the strength and cohesion their community of staff had gained from the process.

Dr Cecilia Cunningham, founder and executive director of MCNC, spoke to the way in which staff could capitalize on Peer Review to support robust and fair teacher evaluation. Dr. Cunningham noted that Peer Review can be a superior alternative to traditional evaluations. “If teachers learn to be reflective, build professional relationships among peers, become more purposeful in planning and feel that they are true stakeholders in the success of a school then students will be the true beneficiaries of a changed system. “

For information on Peer Review, or the MCNC Summer Professional Development Institute, please contact Dr. Cunningham at ccunningham(at)mcnc(dot)us. To register for the MCNC Summer PD Institute which will hold five workshops on Peer Review please click here.

MCNC is a pioneer in developing small schools on college campuses where high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s degree or transferable college credits upon graduation. MCNC, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain dual enrollment in high school as a viable and necessary college readiness educational model.

To get a comprehensive overview of the history, design principles, current work and achievements of the Middle College National Consortium, please visit us at http://www.mcnc.us.
Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://www.mcnc.us

Nancy Hoffman to be Keynote Speaker at MCNC Summer Professional Development Institute

Renowned educator Nancy Hoffman from Jobs For the Future (JFF) will be the keynote speaker at MCNC’s annual Summer Professional Development Institute which will be held from June 29th-July 2nd at the Jersey City Hyatt in Jersey City, NJ. Ms. Hoffman works with JFF’s Early College High School initiative, a network of over 270 schools in 28 states, to expand opportunities for high school students to take college level courses and receive an Associate’s degree.


New York, New York (PRWEB) April 24, 2012

Middle College National Consortium is excited to announce that Nancy Hoffman, Vice President and Senior Advisor at Jobs for the Future, will be the keynote speaker at MCNC’s annual Summer Professional Development Institute to be held from June 29th- July 2nd at the Jersey City Hyatt in Jersey City, NJ. Jobs for the Future (JFF) is a Boston based national non-profit focused on improving educational and workforce outcomes for young people and adults. Ms. Hoffman works with JFF’s Early College High School initiative, a network of over 270 schools in 28 states, to expand opportunities for high school students to take college level courses and receive an Associate’s degree.

Dr. Hoffman’s book, Minding the Gap: Why Integrating High School With College Makes Sense and How to Do It (Harvard Education Press) is considered a classic in the field. Ms. Hoffman has held teaching and administrative posts at Brown, Temple, Harvard, FIPSE, MIT and elsewhere. She holds a B.A. and PhD in comparative literature from the University of California, Berkley. Dr. Hoffman’s most recent book Schooling in the Work Place makes the case for the necessity of work experience tied to college readiness for all high school students.

The theme of this year’s MCNC Summer Professional Development Institute is “Building for the Future: College and Career Readiness”. There will be a strong focus on the Common Core State Standards and how to align them with the work already being done in the schools. Other themes to be explored through workshops will be:
●    Opening a Middle/Early College High School
●    Expanding Middle/Early College Opportunities to Districts and States
●    Peer Review
●    Data is Our Friend
●    Student Support and College and Career Readiness
●    Subject Area Workshops
●    The MCNC Student Leadership Initiative

According to Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, founder and Director of MCNC, “This year’s Summer Institute is a must for all educators interested in increasing their knowledge on how to improve student performance in college classes while in high school and beyond.” To learn more about the MCNC Summer Professional Development Institute and/or register go to the MCNC website at: http://www.mcnc.us/professional-development/conference/summer-professional-development-institute/.

Middle College National Consortium is a pioneer in developing small schools on college campuses where high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s degree or transferable college credits upon graduation. MCNC, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain dual enrollment in high school as a viable and necessary college readiness educational model.
To get a comprehensive overview of the history, design principles, current work and achievements of the Middle College National Consortium, please visit us at http://www.mcnc.us.

Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://www.mcnc.us

Middle Early College High School at Buffalo Saved from Extinction

In spite of the fiscal crisis enveloping Buffalo, NY, Middle Early College High School @ Buffalo, a school primarily serving students at the low end of the economic scale, has been saved from the chopping block. Statistics such as a 93% daily attendance rate, 80% college pass rate and 2.4 average college GPA turned the tide in favor of keeping the school open.


New York, NY (PRWEB) March 20, 2012

Middle Early College High School at Buffalo Principal Sue Doyle

Sue Doyle, founder and long time principal of Middle Early College High School at Buffalo, announced today that her school has been saved from the chopping block. MECHS was scheduled to be closed at the end of the school year due to the fiscal crisis facing the city of Buffalo, New York. “Even though Middle Early College High School may cost a little more per pupil than traditional high schools, it is far more cost effective when outcomes are factored in” said Sue Doyle. Doyle states that minority students make up 80% of enrollment, 70% are socio-economically disadvantaged and 13% are in Special Education.

Ms. Doyle also notes that in spite of demographics that are usually associated with failure in school, MECHS students have a 93% daily attendance rate, 80% college pass rate and 2.4 average college GPA. She relates that “MECHS has the highest percentage of students who scored below grade level when admitted into her program, yet has the highest percentage of African American males obtaining an Associate Degree within 5 years of entering high school”. The power of the MECHS program can be encapsulated by a recent reflection of one of its students. He said, “I’m not going back to the streets. MECHS has taught me I can be something.”

MECHS is a member of the Middle College National Consortium, an organization made up of forty member high schools from across the nation. Its bedrock belief is dual enrollment, a system that provides the opportunity for student to take college classes while still in high school. Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, founder and Director of the MCNC, lauded the decision of the Buffalo Board of Education for sparing Middle Early College High School. “It is rare that you find a school that serves its students as well as MECHS. It would have been a tremendous loss for students, parents and city of Buffalo if MECHS had been forced to close” stated Dr. Cunningham. Dr. Cunningham went on to say that “Students are literally going to college instead of hanging out in the streets. You can’t ask much more than that from a public high school”.

Middle College National Consortium is a pioneer in developing small schools on college campuses where high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s degree or transferable college credits upon graduation. MCNC, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain dual enrollment, in high school, as a viable and necessary college readiness educational model.

To get a comprehensive overview of the history, design principles, current work and achievements of the Middle College National Consortium, please visit us at http://www.mcnc.us.

Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://www.mcnc.us

 

MCNC Encouraged by Findings of November 2nd Jam: Taking the Best of Early College to Scale

Important findings from an analysis by MCNC and Knowledge in the Public Interest of a Jam that included two hundred participants from thirty three states include: • Early Colleges are scalable • Early Colleges are an effective model for helping underserved youth to graduate from high school and go on to college • There is no single Early College model but key attributes are shared

 


New York, NY (PRWEB) February 07, 2012

Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, Executive Director and founder of the Middle College National Consortium (MCNC), announced today that an analysis of the data from the November 2nd Jam, Taking the Best of Early College to Scale, confirms that there is considerable support by a wide array of educators for Early College as an effective model for helping underserved youth to graduate from high school and go on to college. Furthermore, Dr. Cunningham stated that “Early Colleges are scalable and the November 2nd Jam drew a roadmap for this scalability.” Key Findings of the report provided by MCNC and Knowledge in the Public Interest are:

o    There is no single Early College model but key attributes are shared
o    The variation among Early College programs reflect adaptability and may explain success
o    Early College advocates recognize that they must amplify the data that demonstrates the impact of their work
o    Beyond data, Early College advocates see that they must effectively articulate the exceptional benefits to be gained from Early College if they are to garner the social, policy, and financial resources necessary to sustain and scale these programs

The report emphasized that “Demanding academic work, coupled with effective supports, provide the environment in which low-income, underserved and first in family students can thrive. In the hands of an Early College, this formula provides students with the skills necessary to tackle college work successfully.”

The Jam, which, according to its organizers, is a structured conversation aimed at raising issues and surfacing ideas, was organized by Middle College National Consortium (MCNC), Knowledge in the Public Interest along with The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, North Carolina New Schools Project, University System of Georgia, Early College Design Services/Jobs For The Future, Gateway to College National Network, and Texas High School Project. Two hundred educators from thirty three states participated in the Scalability Jam. Dr. Cunningham noted that while there was general agreement among Jam participants that dual enrollment is recognized as a vital component of Early Colleges the strength of the model lies in the adaptability of the model to different states, institutions and systems.

Middle College National Consortium is a pioneer in developing small schools on college campuses where high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s degree or transferable college credits upon graduation. MCNC, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain dual enrollment, in high school, as a viable and necessary college readiness educational model.
To get a comprehensive overview of the history, design principles, current work and achievements of the Middle College National Consortium, please visit us at http://www.mcnc.us.

Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://www.mcnc.us

Two Hundred Educators From Across The Country Take Part in JAM

On November 2nd educators from across the country were brought together by a coalition of educational institutions,

Dr. Cecilia Cunningham

“We know that Early College High Schools work for traditionally underserved youth by providing supported dual enrollment. . Completing college courses while still in high school is a clear college readiness indicator that can be adopted now.”

online, to identify the most compelling scalable practices that enable underserved youth to succeed at challenging college coursework. Chief among the Jam members’ recommendations is that dual enrollment, coupled with intense, consistent and competent academic and personal support, be available to all students.

New York, NY (PRWEB) November 10, 2011
The JAM’s sponsors include The-Middle College National Consortium (MCNC), The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, North Carolina New Schools Project, University System of Georgia, Early College Design Services/Jobs For The Future, Gateway to College National Network, and Texas High School Project. Early College schools provide
underserved students with a college preparatory experience, which includes rigorous high school and college classes (dual enrollment) that give high school students a head start on a college degree. They also give students extensive social and academic support as well as providing the opportunity for high school and college faculty to align curriculum and collaborate pedagogically.

Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, founder and executive director of the Middle College National Consortium, commented that “We know that Early College High Schools work for traditionally underserved youth by providing supported dual enrollment. . Completing college courses while still in high school is a clear college readiness indicator that can be adopted now by school districts.” JAM participants spoke to the critical nature of forming partnerships between higher education and secondary education schools and finding ways to control costs. They noted that it is important for policy makers to recognize the long run cost savings of dual enrollment resulting from reduced drop outs, eliminating the need for remedial education, and increasing college graduates.

For more information contact:
Adana Collins (acollins(at)mcnc(dot)us) at MCNC or
Doris Reeves-Lipscomb (dreeves-lipscomb(at)kpublic(dot)org) at KPI

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Hundreds of Educators Sign Up for November 2nd JAM on “Scaling the Best of Early College”

“Scaling the Best of Early College” will be the topic of a JAM to be held on November 2nd, from 11:00 AM to 7:00 PM (EST). A JAM is an online conversation that allows participants to enter and leave the conversation throughout the day, as time permits. It will bring together Early College teachers, college faculty, high school and college administrators, researchers, education professionals and policy makers in a discussion on how the Early College model is the right response to a lot of issues/problems being posed right now in the public school system.

New York, New York (PRWEB) October 26, 2011

Hundreds of educators from across the country are signing up to participate in a November 2nd JAM, from 11:00 AM-7:00PM (EST), on “Scaling the Best of Early College”. “I’m so excited at having the opportunity to speak to my colleagues from around the country about preparing students for college classes. I’d like to share lessons learned from my successes but I’d also like to hear how other schools are assisting students pass college classes” said Fred Crawford, principal of Greenville Technical Charter High School at Greenville Technical College. “I like the idea of a JAM because it allows me, and my colleagues, to enter and leave the conversation throughout the day, as time permits” states Dr. McKinley Williams, President of Contra Costa Community College. He continues, “This will give me an opportunity to speak with other professionals who I ordinarily would not have the time to communicate with. I have found the Early College model to be a boon for our school.” The JAM will bring together Early College teachers, college faculty, high school and college administrators, researchers, education professionals and policy makers.
Early College schools provide underserved students with a college preparatory experience, which includes rigorous high school and college classes (dual enrollment) that give high school students a head start on a college degree. This model has proved to be a highly successful way to increase high school graduation and college entry rates for students who come from poorer households. According to Rob Baird, Vice President of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, “The JAM will allow us to show that Early College is the response to a lot of issues/problems being posed right now in the public school system. There is so much concern about college readiness and preparation but uncertainty about how to engage colleges, and the terms of that engagement. Hopefully, some good ideas for engaging colleges and universities will come out of this JAM.”
The JAM’s sponsors include The-Middle College National Consortium (MCNC), The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, North Carolina New Schools Project, University System of Georgia, Early College Design Services/Jobs For The Future, Gateway to College National Network, and Texas High School Project. Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, Director and Founder of the Middle College National Consortium (MCNC), states that, “The JAM is a way to communicate nationally on Early College without costing anyone any money. It will help us all get better at what we do as we learn from each other. It will also help spread the word about the effectiveness of Early Colleges and best practices“.
All people interested in participating in this JAM are welcome to join. To learn more about the “Scaling the Best of Early College…” JAM see an informational video at http://www.mcnc.us/professional-development/JAM-2012/earlycollegevideo/.
To register go to https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/EarlyCollege.
For more information contact:
Adana Collins (acollins(at)mcnc(dot)us) at MCNC or
Doris Reeves-Lipscomb (dreeves-lipscomb(at)kpublic(dot)org) at KPI
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Challenge Early College High School, A MCNC Member School, Wins Prestigious U.S. Blue Ribbon Award

Challenge Early College High School, a MCNC Member school, is a recipient of this year’s U.S. Blue Ribbon award for having its students score in the top 10% on Texas State tests. The award is aligned with President Obama’s goal of making education the lynchpin in improving the U.S. economy, closing the achievement gap, and making US business competitive in the global market place. The MCNC Early College model provides high school students, especially those underserved by their previous schools, the opportunity to earn both a high school diploma and an associate degree, or up to two years of credit toward a bachelor’s degree.

New York, New York (PRWEB) October 04, 2011

Challenge Early College High School @ Houston Community College SW (Texas), a MCNC Member school, is one of this

Dr. Cecilia Cunningham

Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, President MCNC

In the 2009-2010 school year 75% of Challenge’s graduating class enrolled in a four year college and 20% in a two year college. This data is a strong indicator of a topnotch Blue Ribbon school.

year’s winners of the prestigious U.S. Blue Ribbon award which is eagerly sought by public and private schools across the country. To qualify, schools must be serving a population that has previously been underserved by their schools. The Blue Ribbon Award rewards schools that have increased student achievement and narrowed the achievement gap. Blue Ribbon schools meet one of two criteria:

  •     They dramatically improve student performance to high levels on state tests;
  •     Their students achieve in the top 10 percent of their state on state tests;

Challenge Early College High School received the Blue Ribbon award for having its students score in the top 10% on Texas State tests. The award is aligned with President Obama’s goal of making education the lynchpin to improving the U.S. economy and closing the achievement gap.    Previous MCNC U.S. Blue Ribbon award winners are Middle College HS @ Santa Ana College, Middle College HS @San Joaquin Delta College, Greenville Technical Charter High School @ Greenville Technical College, Harbor Teacher Preparatory Academy @ Los Angeles Harbor College and Middle College High School @ Contra Costa College. Cecilia Cunningham, founder and director of MCNC, stated that Challenge ECHS has been successful because “The faculty and administration not only deeply care about their students, but they have immersed themselves in professional development to improve their practice. The results of this hard work can be seen in their college going rate. In the 2009-2010 school year 75% of Challenge’s graduating class enrolled in a four year college and 20% in a two year college.” Dr. Cunningham added that “Justin Fuentes, the former principal of Challenge, and his successor, Tonya Miller, are perfect examples of the difference good leadership can make.”

 

The MCNC Early College model provides high school students, especially those underserved by their previous schools, the opportunity to earn both a high school diploma and an associate degree, or up to two years of credit toward a bachelor’s degree. This dual enrollment initiative exposes students to the college “experience”, rigorous high school and college classes, new ways of viewing the world and getting a head start on a college degree. It also gives the opportunity for high school teachers to align their curriculum with college classes and allows college professors to collaborate with high school faculty. MCNC high schools emphasize embedding college knowledge strategies into practice. The MCNC peer review model is a major part of the professional development to improve teacher practice and increase student achievement. The peer review program is designed to publicly share and discuss teachers’ best practice and is structured around reflective writings and a formal peer review.

Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain dual enrollment as a viable and necessary educational model. Middle College National Consortium’smission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an associate degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.

To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of our history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information

Tony Hoffmann

Middle College National Consortium

http://mcnc.us

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Coalition of Education Groups to Sponsor a JAM on Scaling the Best of Early College

On Wednesday, November 2, 2011 from 11:00 AM to 7:00 PM a coalition of Early College intermediaries will hold a JAM entitled “Scaling the Best of Early College”. A JAM is an online moderated exchange which allows far flung professionals of diverse backgrounds and experiences, who might not ordinarily communicate, to gain from one another’s perspectives. This JAM will bring together early college teachers, college faculty, high school and college administrators, researchers, education professionals and policy makers.

New York, New York (PRWEB) October 17, 2011

A coalition of Early College Intermediaries announced today that they will hold a first of a kind JAM on “Scaling the Best of Early College”. The intermediaries are national and statewide groups that work with underserved youth. They have each had important success in preparing college ready students using Early College models. They hope that the JAM will allow a broad group of practitioners and policy makers to examine Early College and discuss how key elements can be adapted to help large scale public systems equip underserved students for college success and completion.

A JAM is an online moderated exchange. The discussion is asynchronous, so participants come and go as their schedules permit. It allows far flung professionals of diverse backgrounds and experiences, who might not ordinarily communicate, to gain from one another’s perspectives. This JAM will bring together early college teachers, college faculty, high school and college administrators, researchers, education professionals and policy makers.

According to Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, founder and director of MCNC (The Middle College National Consortium), “This JAM offers a unique opportunity for educators to share successes and seek solutions to scaling issues.”
The JAM will take place on Wednesday, November 2, 2011 from 11:00 AM-7:00 PM (EST)

The JAM’s sponsors include The-Middle College National Consortium (MCNC), The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, North Carolina New Schools Project, University System of Georgia, Early College Design Services/Jobs For The Future, Gateway to College National Network, and Texas High School Project. Early Collegeschools provide underserved students with a college preparatory experience, which includes rigorous high school and college classes (dual enrollment) that give high school students a head start on a college degree. They also help high school and college faculty to align curriculum and collaborate pedagogically.

To learn more about the “Scaling the Best of Early College…” JAM see an informational video athttp://www.mcnc.us/professional-development/JAM-2012/earlycollegevideo/. To register go tohttps://www.surveymonkey.com/s/EarlyCollege. For more information contact:

Adana Collins (acollins(at)mcnc(dot)us) at MCNC or

Doris Reeves-Lipscomb (dreeves-lipscomb(at)kpublic(dot)org) at KPI