Two Hundred Educators From Across The Country Take Part in JAM

On November 2nd educators from across the country were brought together by a coalition of educational institutions,

Dr. Cecilia Cunningham

“We know that Early College High Schools work for traditionally underserved youth by providing supported dual enrollment. . Completing college courses while still in high school is a clear college readiness indicator that can be adopted now.”

online, to identify the most compelling scalable practices that enable underserved youth to succeed at challenging college coursework. Chief among the Jam members’ recommendations is that dual enrollment, coupled with intense, consistent and competent academic and personal support, be available to all students.

New York, NY (PRWEB) November 10, 2011
The JAM’s sponsors include The-Middle College National Consortium (MCNC), The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, North Carolina New Schools Project, University System of Georgia, Early College Design Services/Jobs For The Future, Gateway to College National Network, and Texas High School Project. Early College schools provide
underserved students with a college preparatory experience, which includes rigorous high school and college classes (dual enrollment) that give high school students a head start on a college degree. They also give students extensive social and academic support as well as providing the opportunity for high school and college faculty to align curriculum and collaborate pedagogically.

Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, founder and executive director of the Middle College National Consortium, commented that “We know that Early College High Schools work for traditionally underserved youth by providing supported dual enrollment. . Completing college courses while still in high school is a clear college readiness indicator that can be adopted now by school districts.” JAM participants spoke to the critical nature of forming partnerships between higher education and secondary education schools and finding ways to control costs. They noted that it is important for policy makers to recognize the long run cost savings of dual enrollment resulting from reduced drop outs, eliminating the need for remedial education, and increasing college graduates.

For more information contact:
Adana Collins (acollins(at)mcnc(dot)us) at MCNC or
Doris Reeves-Lipscomb (dreeves-lipscomb(at)kpublic(dot)org) at KPI

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