New Publication by Researchers from Teachers College and Rutgers University Outlines the Benefits of Dual Enrollment Programs like MCNC

“Dual Enrollment: A Strategy for Educational Advancement of All Students” is a thoroughly researched publication of the Blackboard Institute that rigorously documents the benefits of dual enrollment, the name given to programs like those offered by the Middle College National Consortium that allow high school students to enroll in both high school and college courses simultaneously. Middle College National Consortium’s dual enrollment program not only allows students to experience college early, and take more challenging courses, but also is a way to assist students to go to college who are traditionally underrepresented in higher education.

LIC, NY (Vocus) August 11, 2010

Middle College National Consortium proudly announces that Elizabeth Barnett, Ph.D., Senior Research Associate, Teachers College, Columbia University and Liesa Stamm, Ph.D., Senior Research Associate-Rutgers-Camden Center for Childhood Studies, have published their rigorously documented treatise on dual enrollment in the latest edition of Blackboard Institute. In her capacity as a researcher for the National Center for Restructuring Education, Schools and Teaching Elizabeth Barnett has done extensive research on the Middle College National Consortium’s dual enrollment program. Dual Enrollment is the name given to programs that allow high school students to enroll in both high school and college courses simultaneously. Dual Enrollment not only allows students to experience college early, and take more challenging courses, but also is a way to assist students to go to college who traditionally have been underrepresented in higher education.

Barnett and Stamm found that male students, low income students and underprepared students disproportionately benefitted from an early college experience. Some of the advantages that Barnett and Stamm associate with dual enrollment for traditionally underserved students in higher education are increasing students’ educational aspirations, reducing high school dropout rates, better preparing students for college courses, encouraging their enrollment in college, and reducing the need for remedial coursework. Barnett and Stamm point out that high achieving students, high schools, colleges, employers and the public in general are also major beneficiaries of dual enrollment.

Dr. Cecilia Cunningham, president and founder of the Middle College National Consortium, praised Ms. Barnett’s and Ms. Stamm’s report for its insightfulness and thoroughness. In pointing to her own organization Dr. Cunningham stated that “Middle College National Consortium partner high schools, because of their dual enrollment programs, have the positive attributes that Barnett & Stamm found in dual enrollment programs: high school graduation rates, college going rates, and college GPA’s that far exceed other schools with similarly underserved students.” Given the successes of dual enrollment, Dr. Cunningham laments the fact that student access to college is severely limited by the availability of funds. As the report notes, society often saves money by supporting dual enrollment programs through reducing the dropout rate, reducing incarceration rates, reducing the need for college remedial classes and shortening the time students attend college. Dr. Cunningham points out that in Middle College National Consortium Early College High Schools “Upon graduating from high school (2008-2009 school year), 12th graders accumulated an average of 14 college credits, a 92% cumulative course pass rate, and earned a 2.62 college GPA.”

To learn more about dual enrollment or the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of the history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information:
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
718-361-1981
thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us

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