Middle College National Consortium’s Student Leadership Initiative Set to Explore Habitat and Humanity

After seven months of study, organizing and action, students from Middle College National Consortium schools across the nation will convene at Edgecombe HS to share their experiences, knowledge and local projects in the hopes of building a network of youth that will make a difference. The annual MCNC Student Leadership Initiative is scheduled to run from April 27th to May 1st in Tarboro, North Carolina.

New York, New York (PRWEB) April 26, 2011

Two hundred Early College/Middle College students representing 18 Middle College National Consortium schools will be exploring issues of Habitat and Humanity at a Student Leadership Initiative Conference in Tarboro, NC, April 27-May 1. The annual event, which engages students in local projects of national significance is being hosted by students and teachers from Edgecombe Early College HS. The Student Leadership Initiative, in its 18th year, engages students, 14-18 years of age, who attend a high school on a community college campus, in research and activities that empower them to take actions that make a difference in the world. After seven months of study, organizing and action, they convene at a host school for four days to share their experiences, knowledge and local projects in the hopes of building a network of youth that will make a difference.

Recent conferences have employed social media to build youth connections and outreach around Social Justice in New Orleans, Water Protection and Accessibility in Greenville, SC, and My Green City, at Estes Park, Colorado. This year’s conference theme, Preserving Our Habitat, Saving our Humanity grew out of the rebirth and rebuilding of the Tarboro community after devastating floods swept through the region over a decade ago. Preserving the culture of this historically significant community was at odds with environmental sustainability. Participating students will see, first hand, how the residents faced and overcame this dilemma.

Students attending the conference work for seven months doing local research and working on local projects. In Greenville, they will raise funds, awareness and assist in the rebuilding of a local play area for needy children. In Los Angeles, students are taking the message of habitat stewardship to their classmates and to youngsters in local middle schools. In New York they are learning about rooftop gardening as an alternative air filtration system and way to improve urban habitats. Students from the host school have spent the year using discarded cardboard, which occupied too much space in landfills, to make kayaks. The school population of 157 students have built floating watercrafts that will take part in a race in the Tarboro River as the climax of the conference. As a concluding activity all students will make ten minute films to be shown at a film festival and be the focus of panel discussions held on the Edgecombe Community College campus in North Carolina. Upon returning to their communities, participants will share what they learned in Tarboro with classmates and use that information to sustain programs they have started on their campuses.

Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain high school/college dual enrollment as a viable and necessary educational model. Middle College National Consortium’s mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s Degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.

To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of our history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://mcnc.us
718-361-1981 X6
thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us

 

Fulfilling Promises: Winter 2011

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Fulfilling Promises
Vol. 17 | No. 1  | Winter 2011


Announcement: 

MCNC has redesigned and launched the new and improved website to be more user-friendly and informative about the Middle / Early College. Visit our new website at www.mcnc.us


In this Issue 

Click here to read the entire newsletter (PDF Version)


Consortium Matters

Cecilia Cunningham | DirectorIn June 2010, the New York City Department of Education in collaboration with the City University of New York (CUNY) issued a report to every NYC high school on the retention rate for the 2007 graduates who had enrolled in CUNY and were still there after 4 semesters.  Preliminary data suggest that MCNC Early Colleges and their College partners have institutionalized practices worth replicating by colleges seeking to retain and graduate an under-served population.

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Student Support and College Readiness
Lead to Harbor’s Success

…College Readiness is infused in every subject area.  The social studies department challenges students to become critical thinkers and effective communicators by requiring them to read and analyze complex texts…The math department uses research-based educational tools for course analysis and performance assessment…

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Become a College Ready School
18th Annual Summer Professional Development Institute 2011
July 7 – 10, 2011
Hyatt Regency Jersey City
New Jersey, NJ

Register Now
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Electronic Professional Development at Charles School
Writing well is one of the most important skills to master for college success.

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Michigan Nurtures Early Middle Colleges
When Middle Colleges first began in Michigan in 1990, few would thought that 21 years later there would be 20 schools embodying those same principles.

Read More

“I’ve Never Had To Do This Before”
So spoke a 12th grader when asked to apply his math knowledge to a real life example.  What’s going on here?

Read More

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Middle College National Consortium
27-28 Thomson Avenue, Suite 331, Long Island City, NY 11101
718-361-1981
www.mcnc.us

Middle College National Consortium Launches Comprehensive New Website

The totally redesigned and updated MCNC website, http://www.mcnc.us, has been receiving rave reviews . Information as diverse as New School Development, School Improvement, Teacher Effectiveness, Resources and Professional Development is now readily available.

New York, New York (Vocus/PRWEB) April 19, 2011

After more than six months of work the Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) launched its reconstructed website last week. It received accolades from educators from across the country. Sue Doyle, principal of Middle College High School at Erie Community College, commented on the range of information available on the website. “On this one website I can find demographic information on other Early Colleges, professional development opportunities and programs for my school, and a great resource section. It’s exciting.”

“When I looked at the Outcomes section of the website I was happy to see how well below average students, as defined by eighth grade test data, were doing. The data confirms the successes our students are having in their college classes” said Mattie Adams, principal of Harbor teacher Preparation Academy at Los Angeles Harbor College. Nationally, Early College HS students, in 2009, on the average, had a 2.78 college GPA and had accumulated 42 college credits. Both our proficient and not proficient students, as defined by eighth grade test data, did almost as well with a GPA difference of only .43 and a credit accumulation gap of only 12 credits.

MCNC schools continue to learn, improve and teach other schools. Their statistics on graduation rates, attendance and standardized test scores often exceed the norms in their district and/or state. Additionally, they have the opportunity to participate in Consortium pilot programs such as the EPIC Math Assessment, the Student Leadership Initiative, Enhanced Dual Enrollment and ePD. “So many people have asked me what does it mean to be an MCNC School and what are these pilot programs you are involved in. I can now point them towards MCNC’s restructured website where they can get a full explanation” said Fred Crawford, principal of Greenville Technical Charter HS at Greenville Technical College.

Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain high school/college dual enrollment as a viable and necessary educational model. Middle College National Consortium’s mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s Degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.

To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of our history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://mcnc.us
718-361-1981 X6
thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us

 

Article on Successful College Retention Practices to Be Published in Community College Week

Five Lessons on College Retention from Early Colleges, an article laying out the practices used in early college high schools that lead to student success in college, will be published today in Community College Week. The authors, Dr. Cecilia Cunningham and Dr. Roberta Matthews have a twenty-five year history of working together on high school/college collaborations.

Quote startThe intentional links between secondary and post secondary education found in Middle College National Consortium and Woodrow Wilson early college high schools help students not only get to college but to stay in collegeQuote end

New York, NY (Vocus/PRWEB) April 12, 2011

Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, founder and president of the Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) , and Dr. Roberta Matthews, former Provost and Vice-President for Academic Affairs at Brooklyn College in New York City, announced that their article, Five Lessons on College Retention from Early Colleges, will be published in Community College Week this week. The article describes lessons learned on effective tactics to keep students in college by two organizations, The Middle College National Consortium (MCNC) and the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. “The intentional links between secondary and post secondary education found in Middle College National Consortium and Woodrow Wilson early college high schools help students not only get to college but to stay in college” notes MCNC president, Dr. Cecilia Cunningham.

The Middle College National Consortium and the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation have opened, and supported, over fifty small early college high schools. Their high school students’ record of college GPA average, college course credit accumulation and college perseverance exceeds those of students from other schools with similar demographics. According to the article by Dr. Cunningham and Dr. Matthews, the five early college practices that have had the most influence on student success are:

  • Being on a college campus rather than transitioning onto one

    Dr. Cecilia L. Cunningham, President MCNC

  • Wraparound support and advocacy for students
  • No interruptions or diversions between graduating from high school and entering college
  • Building realistic understandings and expectations in students’ families
  • Strong alignment between high schools and colleges is seen as a given, not simply a goal

Dr. Matthews concludes by noting “Early Colleges succeed because they create an environment based on the presence of all the design features we have described. They promote the difficult dialogue among practitioners, on all levels, that result in substantive changes in education.”

Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain high school/college dual enrollment as a viable and necessary educational model. Middle College National Consortium’s mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s Degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.

To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of our history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information
Tony Hoffmann
Middle College National Consortium
http://mcnc.us
718-361-1981 X6
thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us