Professor Larry Cuban Featured at MCNC’s 17th Annual Winter Principal’s Leadership Conference

Middle College National Consortium, a leader in the movement to establish and sustain high school/college dual enrollment, held its 17th annual Winter Conference in Newport Beach, CA. Dr. Larry Cuban, Professor Emeritus of Education at Stanford University, and Dr. Cecilia Cunningham, founder and president of the Middle College National Consortium, lead the conference with presentations and workshops on the roles of a principal, managing change and instructional leadership and improving instruction within schools.

New York, New York—February 22, 2011.

What is a principal?  An educational leader?  An adroit manager?  A savvy politician?  All of the above?  This and other topics provided the basis of Dr. Larry Cuban’s keynote address at the MCNC Winter Conference.   Dr. Cuban, Professor Emeritus of Education at Stanford University, pointed out that since principals have three conflicting roles, instructional, managerial and political, which constantly must be juggled, principals must know their own abilities, be willing to delegate responsibilities and be able to form a team and a plan that can get the job done.Larry Cuban & Cecilia Cunningham

As part of his presentation Dr. Cuban led discussions and small group work around building professional learning communities and managing change. He emphasized that changes in schools may be incremental but, if done correctly, can lead to fundamental change.

Dr. Cecilia Cunningham, founder and president of the Middle College National Consortium, lead a series of workshops focused on improving instruction within schools.  She referred to an article written by Richard F. Elmore, “Improving the Instructional Core”, which states that “there are only three ways to improve student learning at scale:  you can raise the level of content…you can increase the level of skill and knowledge that teachers bring… you can increase the level of students’ active learning…that’s it.  Everything else is instrumental”.  Dr. Cunningham’s workshop focused on the relationship between Elmore’s theories of improving student learning and the MCNC’s Six Design Principles.

Additionally, Dr. Cunningham lead numerous other workshops including “MCNC Where Are We Now?”,  “How Do Revised Benchmarks Work For My School?”, and “The Innovation Lab:  Current and Future.”  Dr. Cunningham stated, “Educators seldom get the opportunity to have extended time to think and focus on improving their schools. One of my main goals was to give conference attendees ample time to work within their schools and then share their work across schools and geographical regions. “

Before adjourning the conference’s agreed upon the following goals for its students:

  • All MCNC students will graduate with at least 24 college credits.
  • At least 80% of students will receive a Bachelors or Associates degree     within six years of graduating.
  • Course pass rates in high school and college will be 95% or better.
  • Attendance will be 95% or better.
  • Standardized tests will surpass those of comparable schools.

Middle College National Consortium, headquartered in New York City, is a leader in the movement to establish and sustain high school/college dual enrollment as a viable and necessary educational model. Middle College National Consortium’s mission is to develop small schools in which high school students, especially those who have been previously underserved by their former schools, can earn both a high school diploma and either an Associate’s Degree or transferable college credits upon graduation.

To learn more about the Middle College National Consortium, visit us at (http://www.mcnc.us/) for a comprehensive overview of our history, design principles, current work and achievements.

Contact information

Tony Hoffmann

Middle College National Consortium

http://mcnc.us

718-361-1981 X6

thoffmann(at)mcnc(dot)us